Mumbling on about The Mumbles on race day

So what does a day out in The Mumbles look like. It can be very energetic for some. For me it contains s lot of slow strolling from bench to bench along the front which are at least 10 metres apart, from the centre of town to the pier, a distance of 800 metres or so. During this time a lot of observation takes place, admiring the activity of others.

One is immediately hit by the rate of different activities along the promenade which stretches all the way from Swansea around to The Mumbles, all of 5 miles or so. It is divided into two lanes. One is depicted by two people holding hands – for lovers or more generally, pedestrians with the occasional panting jogger. The other sign has the symbol of a cyclist. Now, this term can vary between the hire-bikes ridden gently by those unused to demanding activities and those cycling sleek road bikes at ferocious speeds who are totally unable to stop if a two-legged user strays into the two-wheeled lane. Somehow, there are no collisions.

First things first – the first coffee of the day is always the best. In amongst the parked boats, most of which are tatty, dirty, scruffy and look like they would sink if they even got close to water, are several coffee shacks/vehicles. That took sun a good hour sitting and chatting to Joy, a senior local who sang the praises of her home town.

The next stop at the launching ramp, which passes for the town harbour, was for a similar period of time, watching the boats unloaded from trailers, getting rigged and setting off across the bay to the starting line up for a days racing. Sadly the wind was only whispering so it took a while to get over there.

Now these guys were really important and ready to spring into action. They were the Race Support Team. If a boat got into difficulty miles away on the other side of the bay, they would have to get straight back, with no wind to speak of, and the team would jump into action and sort out any problems. What a responsibility!

A lot of time was spent watching others engaged in busy activities. Fishing was the most energetic, as was watching the fishermen.

There was a lot of ice cream consumption taking place by people of all ages.

Gentle activities include family swimming, leisurely paddle-boarding, launchng private boats & dingies.

Up at the pier tea is of course essential.

But I am looking for a place to have a little dose. I have my eye on the benches at the end of the pier. The Mumbles has four RNLI lifeboat stations. Originally the local lifeboat was stored under the cliff but a proper building was built in 1866 around a ramp a few years after.

Two more stations and ramps were built at the end of the pier – the one on the left, now a host to a breeding colony of very noisy gulls, in 1922 and the other on the right in 2014.

I found a nice comfy bench and settled down for a nap. I was reassured that my security was taken care of by two new friends. I don’t know what my female pal was peeping at below.

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